Global markets shriveling: HSBC fears world recession with no lifeboats left

Titanic
May 2015 GLOBAL ECONOMYThe world economy is disturbingly close to stall speed. The United Nations has cut its global growth forecast for this year to 2.8pc, the latest of the multinational bodies to retreat. We are not yet in the danger zone but this pace is only slightly above the 2.5pc rate that used to be regarded as a recession for the international system as a whole. It leaves a thin safety buffer against any economic shock – most potently if China abandons its crawling dollar peg and resorts to ‘beggar-thy-neighbor’ policies, transmitting a further deflationary shock across the global economy.
The longer this soggy patch drags on, the greater the risk that the six-year old global recovery will sputter out. While expansions do not die of old age, they do become more vulnerable to all kinds of pathologies. A sweep of historic data by Warwick University found compelling evidence that economies are more likely to stall as they age, what is known as “positive duration dependence”. The business cycle becomes stretched. Inventories build up and companies defer spending, tipping over at a certain point into a self-feeding downturn. Stephen King from HSBC warns that the global authorities have alarmingly few tools to combat the next crunch, given that interest rates are already zero across most of the developed world, debts levels are at or near record highs, and there is little scope for fiscal stimulus. “The world economy is sailing across the ocean without any lifeboats to use in case of emergency,” he said.
In a grim report – “The World Economy’s Titanic Problem” – he says the US Federal Reserve has had to cut rates by over 500 basis points to right the ship in each of the recessions since the early 1970s. “That kind of traditional stimulus is now completely ruled out. Meanwhile, budget deficits are still uncomfortably large,” he said. The authorities are normally able to replenish their ammunition as recovery gathers steam. This time they are faced with a chronic low-growth malaise – partly due to a global ‘savings glut’, and increasingly to a slow ageing crisis across most of the Northern hemisphere. The Fed keeps having to defer its first rate rise as expectations fall short.
Each of the past four US recoveries has been weaker than the last one. The average growth rate has fallen from 4.5pc in the early 1980s to nearer 2pc this time. The US fiscal deficit has dropped to 2.8pc but is expected to climb again as pension and health care costs bite, even if the economy does well. The U.S. cannot easily launch a fresh New Deal. Public debt was just 38pc on GDP when Franklin Roosevelt took power in 1933, and there were few contingent liabilities hanging over future US finances. “Fiscal stimulus – a novel idea at the time – may have been controversial, but the chances of it working to boost economic activity were quite high given the healthy starting position. Today, it is much more difficult to make the same argument,” he said. –Telegraph
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This entry was posted in Age of Decadence, Austerity, Banking Crisis, Boom and Bust Cycles, Currency - Economic warfare, Economic Collapse, Economic Hardship or Loss, Ethnic tensions, Financial market turmoil, Flashpoint for war, Geopolitical Crisis, Greed and Corruption, Hierarchal Control, Hoarding Resources, Immigration surge, Infrastructure collapse, Political turmoil, Resource War, Social Meltdown, Squandered Resources, Struggle for Survival, The Pyramid Model, Troubled Banks, Unsustainable Debt Burden, Widening gap between rich and poor. Bookmark the permalink.

2 Responses to Global markets shriveling: HSBC fears world recession with no lifeboats left

  1. Joseph sonny Skies says:

    How appropriate that the person being quoted is named Stephen King! SCARY stuff!

  2. niebo says:

    “While expansions do not die of old age, they do become more vulnerable to all kinds of pathologies.” A point illustrated by this statement, that “Each of the past four US recoveries has been weaker than the last one.” Because BLOODLETTING does not cure ANEMIA; it makes it worse.

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